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About the NLN

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Nursing Education National League for Nursing - About the NLN

Beverly Malone, PhD, RN, FAAN
CEO, National League for Nursing
New York, New York


Chief executive officer of the National League for Nursing since February 2007, Dr. Beverly Malone is among America's most vocal leaders in the national conversation about the nursing and nurse educator shortage, and the role of nursing in ensuring access to safe, quality, culturally competent care to diverse patient populations, domestically and globally.

Dr. Malone's tenure at the NLN has been marked by a retooling of the League's mission to reflect the core values of caring, diversity, integrity, and excellence and an ongoing focus on advancing the nation's health. Significant faculty development and leadership initiatives she championed, from the NLN Academy of Nursing Education to the International Council of Nurses Education Network, highlight her commitment to prepare a diverse nursing workforce, caring for patients to the full extent of their practice, to address the changing dynamics of today's technology-rich health care environment.

Under Dr. Malone's guidance, the NLN has partnered with corporations, associations, and foundations — ranging from Johnson & Johnson and Laerdal Medical Corporation to AARP and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation - to advance the science of nursing education, increase diversity in nursing and nursing education, and advance excellence in care for seniors. Her testimony in 2009 during Congressional budget hearings was but one example of Dr. Malone's public policy advocacy for increased support for nursing workforce development and advanced education for nurse educators to address the persistent shortage of nurses that threatens health care delivery.

In 2010, the year she was ranked #29 among the 100 Most Powerful People in Healthcare by Modern Healthcare magazine, Dr. Malone served on the Institute of Medicine's Forum on the Future of Nursing Education, contributing to the IOM's groundbreaking report, "The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health," and on the Advisory Committee on Minority Health, a federal panel established to advise the US Secretary of Health and Human Services.

Beverly Malone began her nursing career with a bachelor's degree in nursing from the University of Cincinnati in 1970. She combined further study with clinical practice, a master's in psychiatric nursing, and a doctorate in clinical psychology, which she earned in 1981. Her distinguished career has mixed policy, education, administration, and clinical practice. Dr. Malone has worked as a surgical staff nurse, clinical nurse specialist, director of nursing, and assistant administrator of nursing. During the 1980s she was dean of the School of Nursing at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University. In 1996, she was elected to two terms as president of the American Nurses Association (ANA), representing 180,000 nurses in the USA. In 2000, she became deputy assistant secretary for health within the US Department of Health and Human Services. Just prior to joining the NLN, Dr. Malone was general secretary of the Royal College of Nursing (RCN), the United Kingdom's largest professional union of nurses, from June 2001 to January 2007. Dr. Malone was also a member of the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE).

Dedicated to excellence in nursing education, the NLN is the premier organization for nurse faculty and leaders in nursing education offering faculty development, networking opportunities, testing and assessment, nursing research grants, and public policy initiatives to its 40,000 individual and 1,200 institutional members.

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Nursing Education
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