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Nursing Education National League for Nursing - About the NLN

Dialogue  


Reflection on: Recognizing the Vital Contributions
of the Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse
Submitted by: Nancy L Gattuso, MSN, RN
Date Submitted: September 30, 2011

How refreshing it is to see your support of the LPN!
The LPN is a valuable member of the health care team and unfortunately is a profession that has been frequently overlooked. It is time that the we stand up, show our support and embrace them as colleagues. There is a role in health care for all of us. Let us work together to improve the quality of health care available to citizens of this country!



Reflection on: Recognizing the Vital Contributions
of the Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse
Submitted by: Thomas DeVoyd, RN, MS
Date Submitted: September 25, 2011

I think that the NLN recognizing the contributions of the LPN/LVN is a step in the right direction. I have been interested in the comments that I read. I think that faculty have to recognize that there are other entry levels of practice. The choice to enter into nursing through this should be celebrated. For some students, it is not possible to take the 2-4 years to obtain a ASN or BSN. They need to be in the workforce sooner than this. Many of the nurses that I was mentored by were LPN's. If it wasn't for them I wouldn't be where I am. I applaud the NLN for their stand.



Reflection on: Recognizing the Vital Contributions
of the Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse
Submitted by: Susie Wilson, Ed.D, RN
Date Submitted: September 20, 2011

To the perspective readers, I am impressed that the NLN has taken profound steps addressing the needs of the diversified populations. Cultural Competency in healthcare preferably student nurses' is a topic that has been close to my heart for 18 years. From my perspective regarding culturally competentency/diversified their still needs to be many roads to be traveled. I read in detail the recommendations regarding this matter. If interested I could send my abstract from my dissertation 5/2011 astounding results. I will be exhibiting via poster board at the NNA convention in Kearney, NE. this October. The focus was nursing students in their last quarter/semester in an ADN program. I was given permission from Dr. Josephine Campinha-Bacote to use the tool IAPCC-SV. In place of using her tool please view www.transculturalcare.com I would love to be a part of the team to bring ideals to the table. I have a blue print course regarding cultural competency with nursing students. Another thought to ponder. Once cultural competency is recognized as part of the nursing curriculum, another problem arises what are the hospitals doing to maintain the awareness. Some hospitals mandate the nurses to take a CBT on cultural competency as a power point. Are we truly learning? I totally agree that we should have priority of the different culturals that are often seen. Time is ticking other culturals are on the way. Last, is there any colleges/universities recognizing cultural competency as part of the nursing curriculum. I would like to know for feedback purposes.

I encourage comments.



Reflection on: Recognizing the Vital Contributions
of the Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse
Submitted by: Cheryl L. Landis, MSN, RN
Date Submitted: September 15, 2011

I am excited to read the NLN's affirmation of the importance and value of the licensed practical/vocational nurse! When I graduated from my BSN program and secured a staff nurse position at a prominent medical center, I felt overwhelmed similar to many new nursing graduates. The fabulous LPNs on my team facilitated my learning in many ways. And I, in return, have spent most of my nursing career teaching in a practical nursing program!! Many of our students would probably not be successful if they started their education in an RN program due to a variety of reasons. We have witnessed many educational 'miracles'. The majority of our students desire to use our program as a stepping stone to an RN program! Way to go NLN!!



Reflection on: Recognizing the Vital Contributions
of the Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse
Submitted by: Nancy Sanderson, RN, BSN
Date Submitted: September 12, 2011

I would like to offer a Thank You to this email publication to the NLN for recognizing the LPN/LVN role in nursing. I started out as an LPN graduating in 1985. It was one of my best learning experience that I ever had my instruct MRS. Rossler was the best instructor ever. I do not know if she still teaches this was through Onodaga BOCES in Syracuse New York. I have gone in my career to receive may ADN, BSN and now in MSN working as a clinical instructor and hoping to be teaching didactic in the near future.

I hope that State Board of Nursing never does away with the LPN/LVN nursing programs it is a very good education the students receive and their role is much appreciated and contributes the profession of nursing of patient care in many diverse health care areas.



Reflection on: Recognizing the Vital Contributions
of the Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse
Submitted by: Ronaldo G. Verian, RN, MOH, MPH
Date Submitted: September 11, 2011

A licensed practical/vocational nurse similar to a registered nurse is still a NURSE. We all belong to the same community of nurses despite the diversities we have in the attainment of nursing education and licensure. This recognition is timely for the future of nursing.



Reflection on: Recognizing the Vital Contributions
of the Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse
Submitted by: Kathleen Panagiotes, MA, MSN, RN, BC
Date Submitted: September 9, 2011

Finally! I am so very excited about this. My very long career began as a well educated LPN. My present teaching career is for PN students at Mount Wachusett Community College. I present in a style that allows me to honor them as a vital backbone of past, present and future nursing. We frequently discuss the CMR 244 3.0 of the Massachusetts Board of Registration in Nursing with special attention paid to the wording of the RN vs LPN regulations. My former students work as Assistant Directors of Nursing, Staff Educators, supervisors; in large clinics where they administer IV meds, post-partum and psych units, triage and on and on. Many will continue on, others will work and gain confidence and they all will contribute. We baby boomers are going to need care and the LPN is the level to provide it in so many areas.



Reflection on: Recognizing the Vital Contributions
of the Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse
Submitted by: Susan K. Yowler, BSN, RN
Date Submitted: September 9, 2011

Many thanks to the NLN for recognizing the crucial role of the LPN in today's health care arena. Your call for greater understanding of the LPN role encourages me as a PN educator and gives me a foundation upon which to begin dialogue within my own community college to examine the possibility of partnering with our RN program students to offer interprofessional collaboration among RN and PN students. I agree with others' comments here about difficulties in obtaining clinical placements in various acute care settings for PNs. Using the premise of interprofessional collaboration, I have designed pediatric clinicals in the elementary school setting focusing on the childhood obesity epidemic. Our PN students have received a very warm welcome in this area.



Reflection on: Recognizing the Vital Contributions
of the Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse
Submitted by: Doreen Biondolillo, MSN, RN
Date Submitted: September 8, 2011

I was delighted to read the latest communication from the NLN determining that it was about time to recognize the vital contribution of the LPN.I have eduacted the PN student for many years and have never found a group of students so dedicated , filled with compassion and caring. These nurses are truly the first line at the bedside. Last year afetr the NLN summit, I contacted NSNA requesting that they investigate a change in bylaws to allow the PN student to join the organization. Afterall it is a student NURSE association. A vote was taken at the convention and the change was defeated. I would like to know what they are afraid of. If volunteers are needed to pursue this position- please count me in. Afterall, credential do not make the nurse.



Reflection on: Recognizing the Vital Contributions
of the Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse
Submitted by: Holly P. Lanning
Date Submitted: September 8, 2011

After over 3 decades I was thrilled to finally see the recognition directed towards the LPN/LVN! I have been licensed since 1976 and have aquired a wealth of knowledge in the nursing field. I took every opportunity available to me to learn and grow in my chosen career. I had the good fortune to be given the opportunity to take part in a program which enabled me to become a vital part of the healthcare team and function as a "primary care" nurse in a large teaching hospital on an MSPCU and in the CVICU. I was recognized as a "nurse" and never as "only an LPN". I believe we are an important and vital part of the healthcare team, and given the chance, could prove to be a genuine solution to the never ending "nursing shortage". We are here, willing and able to do so! Thank you so very much for the very uplifting and encouraging article.



Reflection on: Recognizing the Vital Contributions
of the Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse
Submitted by: Jessie Grissett, RN, MSN
Date Submitted: September 8, 2011

I agree that the LPN is vital in the health care field and are educated in caring and have excellent clinical skills. I believe there is room for both types of nurses RN and LPN. At the present time most of the physical care of the patients are perfomed by non-licensed staff who do not have the education of the LPN. Why use non-licensed staff when the LPN and RN can work together to provide care for the patients. This would be great for the patients and they would receive quality care.I understand that most hospital are not using then because of Magnet status ,but I believe that LPN,s are just as important in health care. Why use non-licenseed staff when LPNs, can perform a better job because of their education. I think there is academic prejudice and there should be more reconition of the LPN as a member of the nursing community.



Reflection on: Recognizing the Vital Contributions
of the Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse
Submitted by: Carolyn Lyon, MSN, RN
Date Submitted: September 8, 2011

I taught in a Practical Nursing Program for 35 yrs. Our program closed the end of July. I was the Director as well for 33 yrs. It is wonderful to see the NLN acknowledge the LPN/LVN and their contributions to nursing. They do serve a vital role in long-term care but I firmly believe they can also serve a vital role in the hospital at the bedside. Their education has progressed and they are very capable. Most of my graduates returned to school to become RN's but they continued to say they learned more about actual nursing care from their PN education. Thank you for taking a step toward acknowledging their value to the health care team.



Reflection on: Recognizing the Vital Contributions
of the Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse
Submitted by: Lynn Bowman, LPN
Date Submitted: September 8, 2011

It is refreshing to see such an acknowledgement of the LPN's role in health care and also the need for advancement and education. I believe many LPNs such as myself would choose to obtain their RN licensure, but the process is difficult and expensive.
Thank you for addressing this subject!



Reflection on: Recognizing the Vital Contributions
of the Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse
Submitted by: Bethany Ann Alexander, RN, BSN
Date Submitted: September 8, 2011

As a PN Program director we continually see the need for LPN/LVNs in our community. Long term care is definitely the largest employer of PNs. We have also seen clinics, MD Offices; home health agencies hire our graduates in increasing numbers. One thing that has become an increasing challenge to PN programs is the lack of access to do clinicals in hospital settings. Many hospitals are going to all RN nursing staff and thus will not take PN Students in that it is not beneficial or in their best interest to do so. Thus many opportunities that PN students need in the clinical setting are limited... especially in Maternity, Mental Health and Surgery. Due to Long term care facilities admitting acute care residents... that where the PN students receive most of their acute care experience. Hopefully these initiatives will open up the avenue for better clinical experiences for the PN student to gain valuable experience to develop them into a competent nurse.



Reflection on: Recognizing the Vital Contributions
of the Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse
Submitted by: Nancy E. Morris, Master of Science in Nursing Education, Practical Nursing Instructor for North Georgia Technical College
Date Submitted: September 8, 2011

I would like to thank you for finally recognizing the contribution of the LPN/LVN. But please realize that they are not just in the nursing home...they fill vital nursing positions as medical/surgical bedside nurses in acute care facilities and staff many community medical clinics as well.

We need to be more inclusive of the LPN/LVN educational tract when considering RN career pathways because this is the entry point for many RNs.

I started my practice as an LPN myself, and climbed the ladder to the Master of Science (in Nursing Eduction) positon, and I presently am an instructor in a Practical Nursing Program. I found myself a much better prepared bedside nurse which is, after all, where the nurse is really needed today, and what nursing education should REALLY be about. I truly believe that we are trying to put too much "theory" into our programs and not nearly enough clinical preparaton.



Reflection on: Recognizing the Vital Contributions
of the Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse
Submitted by: Holly Lafrance, MSN, RN
Date Submitted: September 8, 2011

As a Director of a Practical Nursing program I applaud the NLN for taking such a strong position on the value of the LPN/LVN and the need to develop seamless educational pathways to assist the LPN/LVN achieve their RN BSN. Here in Central Massachusetts were are developing an LPN to BSN Bridge program in collaboration with 2 State University Nursing programs and 3 PN programs from the Vocational Technical School setting. Our LPN graduate population in our area is also diverse which will increase the availability of diverse nurses to our client population. Thank you.



Reflection on: Recognizing the Vital Contributions
of the Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse
Submitted by: Patricia Castaldi, DNP, RN, ANEF
Date Submitted: September 8, 2011

Thank you to the NLN for recognizing the valuable role of the LPN/LVN! I think that there is a great opportunity to re-establish and/or highlight collaborative RN — LPN/LVN practice in the current health care system.


Reflection on: Recognizing the Vital Contributions
of the Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse
Submitted by: Barbara Whiddon, RN
Date Submitted: September 7, 2011

As a PN Nurse Educator I am thrilled to see the NLN make recognition of such a vital part of the nursing team. LPN/LVN's have made unbelievable strides in the past 10 years. I was an LPN for 14 years and know for a fact how important they are. The year of intense training that they receive is unbelievable. I am proud to be associated with such a great field. Thanks NLN!



Reflection on: Recognizing the Vital Contributions
of the Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse
Submitted by: Maryanne Cruz-McComas, BSN, RN, MSN/Nsg. Ed.
Date Submitted: September 7, 2011

I am very grateful for NLN to acknowledge the magnanimous contribution of LVN/LPNs to healthcare. Statistics shows that life span has increased but chronic illnesses has also afflicted our elders. While acute care is important, majority of their care would be in long term care facilities. The quality of health services and more so, the quality of living lies in the hands of the LVNs where truly the statement, "Nursing discovered the patient," (Hill & Howlett, 2009) is greatly embodied.



Reflection on: Recognizing the Vital Contributions
of the Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse
Submitted by: Amanda L., BSN, RN
Date Submitted: September 7, 2011

How exciting to see the NLN giving the LPN/LVN the recognition that it deserves! The LPN/LVN degree is vital to the aging population. Looking forward to seeing how all this develops over the next few years.


 

 

 

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