Summit 2017 logo

Concurrent Session 2:

8:30-9:15 am

2A. Integrating QSEN Across the Curriculum: Teaching Strategies for Classroom and Clinical

Theme: Teaching Excellence Across the Curriculum
Session Type: Basics
Presenters: Gerry Altmiller, EdD, APRN, ACNS-BC, The College of New Jersey
This presentation will describe teaching strategies that support the QSEN competencies and demonstrate how they can be integrated into the curriculum. Participants will learn activities that emphasize the six QSEN competencies and discover teaching tools and resources that can be implemented in classroom and clinical teaching. Clinical evaluation instruments and  the  use of unfolding case studies will be discussed.

2B. To Explore the Usefulness of the NLN Structure for Critical Conversation in Promoting Critical Dialogue When Used in Debriefing After an IPE Disaster Preparedness Simulation
Theme: Teaching Excellence Across the Curriculum
Session Type: Beyond Basics
Presenters: Linda Glatts, MN, RN, Vancouver Community College; Shirley Clarke, MS, BSN, RN, Vancouver Community College
This project explored the contribution of the NLN debriefing tool, A Structure for Critical Conversation, to promote critical dialogue when used in debriefing following an interprofessional education (IPE) disaster simulation. The research evaluated the debriefing strategy used and determined its impact to encourage critical dialogue. “Debriefing the debriefing" brings forward new themes that can inform educators.

2C. The Lived Experience of Nursing Deans/Directors  Accepting and Later Leaving Their Positions
Theme: Leadership and Systems Change
Session Type: Beyond Basics
Presenters: Kathy Burlingame, EdD, MSN, Galen College of Nursing
Nursing deans/directors are essential mid-level leaders. The turnover of nursing deans/directors and loss of human capital limits a nursing program’s ability to achieve its mission and goals.This study explored the lived experiences of 10 nursing deans/directors who chose to accept and then later, to leave their positions. Themes identified, areas of satisfaction and dissatisfaction, and recommendations will be discussed.

2D. Hospice Simulation vs. Hospice Clinical: A Comparison of Two End-of-Life Teaching Strategies
Theme: Teaching Excellence Across the Curriculum
Session Type:
Presenters: Stephanie Jeffers, PhD, RN, Widener University; Dawn Ferry, APRN, CNP, CHSE, Widener University
Providing a hospice simulation or clinical experience may improve care of the dying patient. This study compares two teaching strategies to teach end-of-life care to nursing students, simulation and clinical. Attitudes toward dying patients were compared between the two groups. Students reported an increase in confidence with end-of-life care after the clinical experience.

2E. Using Apps at the Bedside to Decrease Errors
Theme: Technology (Including Simulation)
Session Type: Basics
Presenters: Nicole Delinski, MSN, CCRN, OSF Healthcare / SIMnext
Technology continues to transform and influence the modes of effective education in the health care arena. A growing workforce of new age innovators fill our institutions to provide our patients with safe and efficient health care. The use of quick and interactive apps proves to be an effective mode of education and training.

2F. Concept-Based Simulation: Using Technology to Make It Happen
Theme: Technology (Including Simulation)
Session Type: Basics
Presenters: Crystel Farina, MSN, RN, CNE, CHSE, Chesapeake College
Concept-based simulation is an innovative approach of using concept-based nursing theory in a unique format that applies to simulation. Transitioning to a concept-based approach, simulation educators can provide simultaneous multi-student simulations using multiple disease processes under the same concept. The use of technology such as an iBook and an EMR enhances the simulation to provide a realistic experience.

2G. Creating Objective Assessments Using Evidence-Centered Design
Theme: Interprofessional Education (IPE) and Practice (IPP)
Session Type: Beyond Basics
Presenters: Sarah Corbitt, MBA, Western Governors University; Crisha Pugh, JD, Western Governors University; Mollie Nordgren, MSN/ED, Western Governors University
Evidence-centered design (ECD) creates a learning environment that can be substantiated. In a field such as nursing, it is vital for a nurse educator to know how the student is competent as well as have evidence of it. ECD can be used in a way to ensure competency through traditional exam questions, and we will show how this can be done.

2H. Nurse Leaders’ Perspectives: Bridging the Education-Practice Gap to Foster Civility and Positive Work Environments
Theme: Leadership and Systems Change
Session Type: Beyond Basics
Presenters: Cynthia Clark, PhD, RN, FAAN, ANEF, ATI Nursing Education
This timely session will highlight findings from an empirical study where 174 practice-based nurse leaders shared perceptionsabout factors that contribute to an adverse working relationship between nursing education and practice, essential skills to be taught in nursing education to foster civility, and effective strategies for nursing education and practice leaders to collaborate to foster healthy work environments.

2I. Cultures of NLN Centers of Excellence: Creating Community and Embracing Diversity in Nursing Education
Theme: Leadership and Systems Change
Session Type: Beyond Basics
Presenters: Tammy Stefek, DNP, RN, Tabor College; Tona Leiker, PhD, APRN-CNS, CNE, Chamberlain College of Nursing
Two qualitative research projects were completed to define cultural characteristics of the original NLN COEs. A conceptual model was developed and reviewed with the COE standards and one COE to confirm the model. A measurement tool was developed for nursing programs to assess and promote healthy academic cultures. This session will summarize research findings and describe next steps in developing a nursing program assessment.

2J. Transitioning Novice Nurses into a New Culture of Practice: Preliminary Findings 
Theme: Teaching Excellence Across the Curriculum
Session Type: Basics
Presenters: Susan Gross Forneris, PhD, RN, CNE, CHSE-A; Molly Kellgren, MS, RN, CNE, CHSE; Amy Kline, MSN, CHSE
Drawing on the pilot experiences of hospitals across the country, this session will report the preliminary findings from the NLN Accelerating to Practice (A2P) program, developed in collaboration with Laerdal, involving both novice nurses and preceptor training programs. Outcomes focused on competency, retention, and culture change will be discussed. Participants will discuss challenges faced by novice nurses and preceptors and how educators can help with the transition to practice. The session will cover: educational interventions targeting known areas of risk with novice nurses transitioning into practice and development of effective coaching at the bedside.  Pilot outcome findings with both novice nurse and preceptor cohorts will be discussed. 


Concurrent Session 3:

9:30-10:15 am

3A. Viewing Practice Through the Lens of Population Health: An Online Introduction Course
Theme: Teaching Excellence Across the Curriculum Session Type: Beyond Basics Presenters: Susan Deane, EdD, MSN, CNE, CNAC, CLN, SUNY Delhi; Jane Murdock, EdD, MSN, CT League of Nursing; Cynthia Holle, DNP, MBA, RN, This presentation will highlight the development, content, and outcomes of a four-module online Introduction to the Population Health course offered by the Connecticut Nursing Collaborative Action Coalition, to prepare faculty and their students, as well as experienced nurses, to integrate evidence-based concepts of population health and wellness to support quality advancement of education and practice.

3B. "First, Do No Harm": Ethical Considerations in Service Learning
Theme: Teaching Excellence Across the Curriculum
Session Type: Basics
Presenters: Lisa Johnson, PhD, RN, CPN, Community College of Philadelphia
As service learning is increasingly integrated into college curriculums, it is essential that potential ethical dilemmas are considered prior to planning service learning experiences for students. This session will identify core standards for service learning, how to assess for potential ethical dilemmas, how to resolve ethical dilemmas should they occur, and strategies to incorporate ethical awareness in students.

3C. How to Document Problematic Student Behavior: Dotting the Is and Crossing the Ts
Theme: Teaching Excellence Across the Curriculum
Session Type: Basics
Presenters: Susan Luparell, PhD, RN, CNE, ANEF, Montana State University
Documentation woes got you down? If so, you are not alone. Many faculty find it difficult to document problematic behavior.  Consequently, students may not be fully aware of how behavior needs to be amended or documentation may not be robust enough to withstand a student grade grievance.  This interactive session will consider strategies for capturing problematic student behavior in a more meaningful way.

3D. Advancing Care Excellence for People with Disabilities Through Simulation
Theme: Teaching Excellence Across the Curriculum
Session Type: Beyond Basics
Presenters: Bette Mariani, PhD, RN, Villanova University; Suzanne Smeltzer, EdD, RN, FAAN, ANEF, Villanova University; Colleen Meakim, MSN, RN, CHSE, Villanova University
The NLN has provided an opportunity to address the educational imperatives for care of people with disabilities (PWD) through Advancing Care Excellence for People with Disabilities (ACE.D). Unfolding cases provide a way for students to translate what transpires in the case study with PWD to a real clinical situation. This presentation will provide an overview of these cases about care of PWD who often receive inadequate nursing care.

3E. Multiple Patient Simulation Research:  Evaluating the Impact of Simulation Preparation on Novice Nurses' Competence and Self-Efficacy in a Multi-Site Randomized Control Trial
Theme: Technology (Including Simulation)
Session Type: Beyond Basics
Presenters: Ashley Franklin, PhD, RN, CCRN, CNE, CHSE, Texas Christian University; Stephanie Sideras, PhD, RN, Oregon Health and Science University; Caitlin Dodd, MSN, RN, CNE, Texas Christian University
According to the Nurse Executive Center, a major concern with novice nurses is their inability to manage multiple responsibilities and anticipate changes in their patients' conditions. This presentation will discuss the positive results from a study that evaluated the effect of three simulation preparation methods on novice nurses' competence and self-efficacy for providing care to multiple patients in the simulation lab.

3F. Mobile Madness: Using Mobile Technology to Engage Students
Theme: Technology (Including Simulation)
Session Type: Basics
Presenters: Cara Gallegos, PhD, RN, Boise State University; Kelley Connor, MS, RN, CNE, CHSE, Boise State University
Mobile devices can be a useful strategy to help engage students while they learn course content. The purpose of this presentation is to describe faculty and student experiences using mobile technology. Nurse educators should explore technology as a teaching resource. This presentation will serve as a case study for faculty interested in using mobile technology in the classroom.

3G. Fostering Interprofessional Collaboration and Enhancing the Simulation Lab Through a Nursing/Engineering Partnership
Theme: Interprofessional Education (IPE) and Practice (IPP)
Session Type: Basics
Presenters: Janet Jackson, MS, RN, Bradley University; Amy Grugan, MSN, RN, TNS, Bradley University
A nursing/engineering partnership was established to improve and develop products for the simulation lab but evolved into a dynamic, interprofessional collaboration. As part of this interprofessional team, students were able to practice leadership skills, build relationships, and participate in research, development and marketing of products to enhance fidelity of simulations and improve student learning.

3H. Workload and Work Environment of Nurse Faculty
Theme: Leadership and Systems Change
Session Type: Beyond Basics
Presenters: Sandra Fights, PhD, RN, CMSRN, Ivy Tech Community College
The increasing shortage of nurse faculty and the understanding of the causes of and influences on their recruitment and retention are important to the future of nursing education. Work environment and workload are familiar discussions among nurse faculty. This session will discuss the relationship between the workload of nurse faculty and their work environment.

3I. Update from the National Council of State Boards of Nursing
Theme: Leadership and Systems Change
Session Type: Basics
Presenters: Nancy Spector, PhD, RN, FAAN, National Council of State Boards of Nursing
This session will highlight the initiatives at NCSBN that are of particular interest to educators. NCSBN’s APRN Education Committee’s recommendations on program approval will be presented. The report of the Nursing Education Trends Committee, which had representation from NLN, will be discussed and next steps will be outlined. Data from the NCSBN 2015 Workforce Study, particularly related to nursing education, will be reported. Resources for faculty, including our new booklet (free of charge) for last semester seniors and new graduates, will be featured. Don’t miss this informative session.

3J. CNE Update: What is New in the Certification World
Theme: Teaching Excellence Across the Curriculum
Session Type: Basics
Presenters: Larry Simmons, PhD, RN, CNE, NEA-BC, National League for Nursing; Linda Christensen, EdD, JD, RN, CNE, National League for Nursing
This session will present information on the current status of the NLN certification program. Eligibility, testing procedures, new developments, and renewal processes will be presented. Global certification issues will also be explored.

3K. Problem Solving for Better Health Nursing: Implementing a Successful International Program within US Schools of Nursing
Theme: Leadership and Systems Change
Session Type: Basics
Presenters: Joyce Fitzpatrick, PhD, RN, FAAN, Case Western Reserve University
The Dreyfus Health Foundation (DHF) launched Problem Solving for Better Health Nursing™ (PSBHN™) in 2002 to unleash the potential of nurses and nursing students in achieving better health and quality of life for all. PSBHN is now active in 15 countries worldwide, with 3 pilot sites in the US. This workshop will provide the basic skills for implementation of the PSBHN Model into nursing curricula at all levels.


Concurrent Session 4:

2:00-2:45 pm

4A. Social Justice, Service Learning, and Reciprocity: The Power of Call and Response, Advocacy an Action
Theme: Teaching Excellence Across the Curriculum
Session Type: Basics
Presenters: Brenda Kucirka, PhD, PMHCNS-BC, CNE, Widener University
This presentation will explore the power of service learning and reciprocity in community partnerships that address social justice issues. Students partner with disenfranchised/ vulnerable populations, embracing the role of nurse as change agent and advocate. Students and their community partners (local and global) work toward positive change and empowerment as they investigate social justice /advocacy needs in the community.

4B. Innovative Pedagogical Approaches to Teaching Undergraduate Nursing Research: Avoiding the Cursory Critique
Theme: Teaching Excellence Across the Curriculum
Session Type: Basics
Presenters: Jamela Martin, PhD, RN, CPNP, Old Dominion University
BSN-prepared nurses are expected to contribute to improvements in practice and patient outcomes, partially through participation in evidence translation. Yet many new graduates lack the confidence and skill to conduct EBP activities upon entry to practice. Could our pedagogical approach to EBP concepts be to blame?  Avoid the cursory critique by engaging your students in learning designed to create, prepare, and excite.

4C. Scaffolding Death and Dying: Introduction of  a "Peaceful" Death Early in the Nursing Curriculum
Theme: Teaching Excellence Across the Curriculum
Session Type: Basics
Presenters: Margie Molloy, DNP, RN, CNE, CHSE, Duke University School of Nursing; Beth Phillips, PhD, RN, CNE, Duke University School of Nursing; Ann Michelle Hartman, DNP, RN, CPNP, Duke University School of Nursing
This presentation will describe how nursing students were introduced to death and dying concepts within first semester courses. A four-part series was strategically delivered in which objectives spanned affective, cognitive, and psychomotor domains. Activities included classroom content, a peaceful death sim, and a debrief. Lessons learned and strategies will be shared to promote implementation in other schools.

4D. Use of Debriefing in Concept-based Learning Activities: Optimizing Integration of Theory and Practice in Care of Specialty Populations
Theme: Teaching Excellence Across the Curriculum
Session Type: Basics
Presenters: Ann Nielsen, PhD, RN, Oregon Health & Science University; Linda Brown, MS, RN, Oregon Health & Science University
In this presentation, use of debriefing in concept-based learning activities will be described. In order to orient to pediatric and neonatal specialty populations, students in a senior-level integrative practicum course examine key concepts of nursing care. Specific debriefing strategies to help students identify patterns between patients, connect theory with practice, and develop clinical judgment will be discussed.

4E. The Effect of Evaluator Training on Reliability of High Stakes Assessment of Student Performance in Simulation: Results of a Nationwide Experimental Study
Theme: Technology (Including Simulation)
Session Type: Beyond Basics
Presenters: Ann Holland, PhD, RN, Bethel University; Linda Blazovich, DNP, RN, CNE, St. Catherine University; Jone Tiffany, DNP, MA, RNC, CNE, ANEF, Bethel University
This presentation will describe the results of a nationwide, experimental study that tested the effectiveness of a training intervention in producing inter/intra-rater reliability among nurse faculty evaluating student performance in simulation. The study produced important conclusions about building a shared mental model and informs best practices in high stakes assessment.

4F. No Boundaries:  Strategies for Creative and Student-Directed Online Learning Activities
Theme: Technology (Including Simulation)
Session Type: Basics
Presenters: Deborah Raines, PhD, EdS, RN, ANEF, University at Buffalo School of Nursing
Web-based technologies remove time, cost, and location barriers from experiential learning opportunities.  Grounded in constructivist pedagogy, this presentation will share the process of moving beyond discussion boards, papers, and quizzes to make an online course an active and engaging activity. Having students explore beyond the walls of the classroom brings a real-world perspective to the material being studied.

4G. Stop Teaching in Silos: Comparing an Interdisciplinary to a Nurses Only Approach in Health Care Education
Theme: Interprofessional Education (IPE) and Practice (IPP)
Session Type: Basics
Presenters: Margaret McCormick, MS, RN, CNE, Towson University
Due to the complexity of medical care, it is important that health care professionals work together. This educational research project compares interdisciplinary to nurses only education.  A clear understanding of how the health care team works is necessary for collaboration. This can improve efficiency, effectiveness, and safety when caring for clients with complex health problems such as asthma and obesity.

4H. The Importance of Meaningful Faculty Recognition: What Our Faculty Are Telling Us
Theme: Leadership and Systems Change
Session Type: Beyond Basics
Presenters: Linda Hollinger-Smith, PhD, RN, FAAN, ANEF, Chamberlain College of Nursing; Susan Groenwald, PhD, RN, FAAN, ANEF, Chamberlain College of Nursing; Chad O'Lynn, PhD, RN, CNE, ANEF, Chamberlain College of Nursing
Meaningful recognition, both formal and informal, is an important part of motivating, rewarding, and retaining nurse faculty. The presenters will discuss results of an exploratory study of faculty’s perceptions of meaningful recognition. Receiving recognition in the following areas were rated as most important:  excellence in teaching, overall job performance, and going “above and beyond” in their roles.

4I. Building Community/Elevating Teaching: Impact of Seeking NLN Center of Excellence Designation
Theme: Leadership and Systems Change
Session Type: Basics
Presenters: Theresa  M. "Terry" Valiga, EdD, RN, CNE, FAAN, ANEF, Duke University School of Nursing; Helen Gordon, DNP, CNM, CNE, CHSE, Duke University School of Nursing
Personal stories and experiences will be used to describe how the process of applying for designation as an NLN Center of Excellence helped transform a faculty community and spotlight the importance of a school’s teaching/learning and faculty development missions. This session will address faculty and student engagement, generation of energy, heightened excitement about teaching/learning, and other significant outcomes.

4J. Applying the NLN CNEA Standards to the Accreditation Process
Theme: Teaching Excellence Across the Curriculum
Session Type: Basics
Presenters: Nelda Godfrey, PhD, ACNS-BC, FAAN, NLN Commission for Nursing Education Accreditation
This session will provide attendees with an overview of the NLN CNEA Standards for Accreditation. The interactive session includes a discussion of the standards, quality indicators, and the implications of the standards for nursing programs across the academic spectrum.

4K. Oral Health and Older Adults: Innovative Interprofessional Teaching Strategies
Theme: Interprofessional Education (IPE) and Practice (IPP)
Session Type: Basics
Presenters: Erin Hartnett DNP, APRN-BC, CPNP, New York University College of Nursing; Judith Haber, PhD, APRN-BC, FAAN, New York University College of Nursing
Oral health has a significant impact on the overall health and well-being of individuals across their life span. Among older adults, poor oral health is associated with pain, loss of teeth, poor nutrition, increased risk for systemic conditions, and serious morbidity and mortality in the case of oral cancer. The purpose of this presentation is to provide innovative interprofessional teaching strategies for faculty to integrate oral health into their curriculum for older adults.


Concurrent Session 5:

3:00-3:45 pm

5A. Formation of a Professional Identity as a Nurse: A Study of Nursing Values
Theme: Teaching Excellence Across the Curriculum
Session Type: Beyond Basics
Presenters: June Larson, EdD, MS, RN, ANEF, University of South Dakota
A professional identity is held by the nurse who has internalized the values and moral norms of the profession. The professional values of students in pre-licensure nursing education programs were measured using a tool based on the nursing code of ethics. Significant differences in the importance respondents placed on professional values were found to be related to type of nursing education program and age.

5B. Rethinking Student Writing Assignments: Findings from the Survey of Nursing Editors on Issues with Student Papers Submitted to Nursing Journals
Theme: Teaching Excellence Across the Curriculum
Session Type: Basics
Presenters: Maureen Shawn Kennedy, MA, RN, FAAN, American Journal of Nursing/Wolters Kluwer
The findings from a survey of nursing editors in the International Academy of Nursing Editors (INANE) about problems with papers submitted by students for publication to nursing journals will be reported in this session.

5C. The Lived Experience of American Indian Nurse Faculty: Sharing a Phenomenological Inquiry
Theme: Teaching Excellence Across the Curriculum
Session Type: Beyond Basics
Presenters: Staci Quant, EdD, RN, Tulsa Community College
American Indian nursing educators, as minority health care leaders, have significant challenges and remarkable opportunities to impact health care delivery.  Semi-structured interviews of American Indian nurse educators teaching full-time in US nursing schools revealed five emergent themes that will be shared with participants. Strategies for support of American Indian faculty and students will also be discussed.

5D. Using Simulation for Improving the Clinical Instructor's Teaching of Ethics to Students in Clinical Settings.
Theme: Teaching Excellence Across the Curriculum
Session Type: Basics
Presenters: Cynthia Randall, DNP, CNL, RN, University of Southern Maine
Nurses who assume roles in clinical teaching may be competent in clinical skills yet have limited nursing education experience or knowledge in clinical instruction. The purpose of this project was to improve the educational experience of clinical instructors in the teaching of ethics to students in the clinical setting. Simulation was shown to be a successful strategy for faculty development.

5E. A New Method to Establish and Sustain CPR Skill Competency
Theme: Technology (Including Simulation)
Session Type: Beyond Basics
Presenters: Margory “Margie” Malloy, DNP, RN, CNE, CHSE, Duke University School of Nursing; Nancy Rogers, MSN, RN, Carroll Community College; Jackie McColgan, MSN, RN, CNE, Springfield Technical College
This longitudinal multisite study evaluated the CPR skills of 300 nursing students using a resuscitation quality improvement (RQI) program that evaluated CPR competency coupled with a USAF-designed performance predictor optimizer (PPO) program. Deliberate practice with the PPO can predict skill decay and maintain CPR skills for most participants. Some participants require more time to maintain their skills.

5F. Multi-Patient Simulation Toolkit: Put It into Practice
Theme: Technology (Including Simulation)
Session Type: Basics
Presenters: Nancy Sullivan, DNP, RN, Johns Hopkins School of Nursing; Sabrina Beroz, DNP, RN, Montgomery County Community College
The goal of this presentation is to introduce the MPS toolkit to nurse educators and provide hands-on experience in developing a multi-patient scenario. Participants will develop a three-patient scenario utilizing the template. The use of manikins or standardized patients in the scenarios will be evaluated. The observational checklist, debriefing, and evaluation of multi-patient simulations will be examined.

5G. Development of a Rural Interprofessional Academic Partnership
Theme: Interprofessional Education (IPE) and Practice (IPP)
Session Type: Beyond Basics
Presenters: Deborah Messecar, PHD, MPH, AGCNS-BC RN, Oregon Health & Science University; Joanne Noone, PhD, RN, CNE, Oregon Health & Sciences University; Tamara Rose, PHD RN, Oregon Health & Sciences University
A three-stage process was used to identify strategies for forming new rural academic partnerships, to develop an interprofessional course, and then evaluate the effectiveness of that course.  Lessons learned about the process to formalize these partnerships and then implement a program of IPE can be used as a blueprint for developing these critical opportunities for other nursing programs located in rural areas.

5H. Making Mistakes: A Journey Toward Transparency
Theme: Leadership and Systems Change
Session Type: Basics
Presenters: Diane Rudolphi, MS, RN, University of Delaware; Jessica Madiraca, MSN, RN, CCRN-K, University of Delaware
The four-year journey and strategies used in initiating a student error, near miss event (ENME) reporting system in the med-surg clinical environment is reviewed. Student ENME data and common themes that emerged will be discussed. Challenges included fear and reluctance of both faculty and students to complete reports. Strategies will be outlined to address these challenges; the benefits are also reviewed.

5I. The Adapted Model of Institutional Support: Increasing Hispanic Student Retention, Graduation, and Professional Contributions
Theme: Role Transitions
Session Type: Beyond Basics
Presenters: Mary Lou Bond, PhD, RN, CNE, FAAN, ANEF, University of Texas at Arlington; Carolyn Cason, PhD, RN, FNAI, FAAN, University of Texas at Arlington; Jose Alejandro, PhD, RN-BC, MBA, CCM, FACHE, FAAN, Tampa General Hospital/South University
The Adapted Model of Institutional Support (AMIS), validated through research, yields two self-assessment instruments (ISA and PSA) for assessing institutional and academic program support for Hispanic student recruitment into and graduation from health professions education programs.  Strategies for systematically using the model and its derived instruments will be presented along with examples of its use.

5J. Nursing Education Perspectives: Writing for the NLN Research Journal
Theme: Teaching Excellence Across the Curriculum
Session Type: Beyond Basics
Presenters: Joyce J. Fitzpatrick, PhD, RN, FAAN, editor; Linda J. Caputi, EdD, RN, CNE, ANEF, Innovation Center editor; Barbara J. Patterson, PhD, RN, ANEF, Research Briefs editor; Leslie Block, managing editor
As a centerpiece of the NLN/Chamberlain College of Nursing Center for the Advancement of the Science of Nursing Education, Nursing Education Perspectives is evolving, with a greater emphasis on nursing education research and innovation in teaching and learning. This session is for anyone who aspires to publish in the NLN journal or serve as a peer reviewer. Meet the editors and learn about the steps involved in publishing an article, from the idea stage through writing, peer review, and eventual publication, online and in print. Bring at least one idea for a journal article for feedback from the editors. 


Concurrent Session 6:

4:00-4:45 pm

6A. The Risky Business of High-Risk Students
Theme: Teaching Excellence Across the Curriculum
Session Type: Basics
Presenters: Laureen Tavolaro-Ryley, MSN, CNS, Community College of Philadelphia; Carol Moriarity, MSN, APNP-BC, Community College of Philadelphia; Jean Byrd, RN, MSN, Community College of Philadelphia
As nurse educators we are constantly straddling the line between retaining students and keeping NCLEX scores at an acceptable level. In this session the lessons learned in formulating a plan to increase the success of high-risk students will be revealed. And the voices of the students who participated in this journey will be heard. Finally the presentation will include a dialogue about the investment in embracing risk and helping students succeed.

6B. Feedback Fizzle: Techniques for Preventing Disappointment, Frustration, and Disengagement with the Evaluation Process
Theme: Teaching Excellence Across the Curriculum
Session Type: Basics
Presenters: Teresa Shellenbarger, PhD, RN, CNE, ANEF, Indiana University of Pennsylvania; Meigan Robb, PhD, RN, Chatham University
This session provides an overview of strategies that faculty can use to give students effective and efficient feedback about their work. Suggestions for the design, development, and delivery of feedback will be discussed.

6C. Clinical Failure of a Nursing Student: The Meaning and Experience for Faculty
Theme: Teaching Excellence Across the Curriculum
Session Type: Basics
Presenters: Amy Stoker, PhD RN, Western Pennsylvania Hospital School of Nursing
With an emphasis on quality and safety in the health care setting, nurse educators have an ethical responsibility to ensure that nursing students are competent to enter into practice. Despite this responsibility, educators often struggle with evaluation and the decision to fail when necessary. The enhancement of structured clinical evaluation, mentorship, and support of educators with the decision to fail is necessary.

6D. Help Them Stay So They Don't Go: A Pilot Study on Student Retention Strategies
Theme: Teaching Excellence Across the Curriculum
Session Type: Basics
Presenters: Carmen Stokes, PhD, FNP-BC, RN, CNE, University of Detroit Mercy
This presentation session will share best practices and lessons learned from a retention project implemented in a midwestern university's baccalaureate nursing program. This project, titled "Freshman Success Seminars," was originally piloted, but due to positive student appreciation and satisfaction scores, has evolved into a mandatory zero credit course required of all freshman nursing students.

6E. Electronic Data Collection: Best Practices and Essential Skills for Research, Evaluation, and Program Operations
Theme: Technology (Including Simulation)
Session Type: Beyond Basics
Presenters: Darrell Spurlock, PhD, RN, NEA-BC, ANEF, Widener University School of Nursing; Andrew Bobal, MEd, Widener University School of Nursing
Nurse educators are increasingly tasked with collecting, managing, and using data in research, program assessment/ evaluation, and for internal operational purposes. This symposium will provide attendees with knowledge and skills to efficiently collect, manage, and evaluate data collected via electronic data collection tools.

6F. Virtual and Standardized Patient Simulations as Scaffolding for Teaching Undergraduate Behavioral Health
Theme: Technology (Including Simulation)
Session Type: Basics
Presenters: Janet Willhaus, PhD, RN, CHSE, Boise State University; Beverley Lugo, MSN, RN, CCRN, Boise State University; Kim Copeland, MSN, RN, CHSE, Boise State University
Faculty will discuss the use of virtual and standardized patient simulations to teach undergraduate behavioral health nursing students. Results of a grant-supported study that created the opportunity for undergraduate nursing students to learn motivational interviewing and screening, brief intervention, referral to treatment (SBIRT) through the use of virtual and standardized patient simulations will also be shared.

6G. Collaborating Interprofessionally in an Online Graduate Curriculum Course
Theme: Interprofessional Education (IPE) and Practice (IPP)
Session Type: Basics
Presenters: Mary Partusch, PhD, RN, CNE, Nebraska Methodist College
Graduate nurse educator students participating in online interdisciplinary curriculum development gain insight into collaboration across collegiate education, which serves them well in future role as educator. Working collaboratively with a health profession faculty, nursing and non-nursing courses were interfaced to foster student interdisciplinary collaboration. Feedback showed value of this learning experience.

6H. Creating Effective Faculty Teams that Include Distance Faculty
Theme: Leadership and Systems Change
Session Type: Basics
Presenters: Renee McLeod, PhD, APRN, CPNP, FAANP, United States University
Have you considered or are you delivering online education? Have you met with resistance from faculty to implement online curriculum? This presentation will discuss the forces driving educators to hire faculty at a distance, and how to develop a successful integrated faculty team. The five killers and nine factors for creating a successful virtual faculty team will be discussed including implications for human resources.

6I. Improving Bedside Nursing Education Through Utilization of Dual Role Nurse Practitioner/ Nurse Educator on the Night Shift
Theme: Professional Nurse Educators in Practice Environments
Session Type: Basics
Presenters: Traci Morgan, MSN, RN, CRNP-AC, Children’s of Alabama; Paula Midyette, MSN, RN, CCRN, CCNS, Children’s of Alabama; Kyla Owen, BSN, RN, Children’s of Alabama
The nursing shortage, particularly in critical care areas, has contributed to an unavoidable influx of new graduates. Nurse educators are present during dayshift; however, the new graduate nurses are assigned to the night shift. In our pediatric CVICU there was a great need for a nurse educator on night shift. We implemented a dual role NP/ nurse educator on the night shift to improve bedside nursing education.

6J. Opening the Door of Possibility with Strengths-Based Pedagogy
Theme: Teaching Excellence Across the Curriculum
Session Type: Beyond Basics
Presenters: Brenda Juby, MN, RN, University of Calgary
This presentation will introduce and review the results of an innovative faculty development pilot project that explored integrating strengths-based pedagogy with elements of relational inquiry tools in an undergraduate-nursing program. Findings from the project will highlight the strengths, challenges and usefulness/impact of a workshop on strengths-based teaching and learning (SBTL) in educating nurses.

6K. Applying for NLN CNEA Pre-Accreditation Candidacy
Theme: Teaching Excellence Across the Curriculum
Session Type: Basics
Presenters: Judith Halstead, PhD, RN, FAAN, ANEF, NLN Commission for Nursing Education Accreditation
This session will describe the policies related to applying for NLN CNEA pre-accreditation candidacy. The interactive session includes a discussion of the steps to the application process for pre-accreditation candidacy.

bookstore-promo-ad

SESN-promo-ad